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gave a tech talk, technology entertainment design, many are boring but his talk has been viewed 100,000 times. here is part of it. >> i was only four years old when i saw my motherlode the washing machine for the very first time in her life. even grandma was invited to see the machine. throughout her life, she had been heating water with fire hood and hand wash laundry for her seven children and sat down in front of the machine and she watched the entire washing program. to my grandmother, the washing machine was a miracle. >> but there are seven billion people on work and most have no access to such miracles. >> two billion have access and the remaining five billion, how do they wash? they wash like this: by hand. it is a time consuming labor which they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine. they don't want to spend such a large part of their life doing this hard work with so relatively low productivity. but when i electric truer to environmentally concerned students they say everyone in the can world cannot have cars and washing machine. how can we tell th
but this gentleman has caught the world's attention because he gave a tech talk, technology entertainment design, many are boring but his talk has been viewed 100,000 times. here is part of it. >> i was only four years old when i saw my motherlode the washing machine r the very first time in her life. even grandma was invited to see the machine. throughout her life, she had been heating water with fire hood and hand wash laundry for her seven children and sat down in front of the machine and she watched the entire washing program. to my grandmother, the washing machine was a miracle. >> but there are seven billion people on work and most have no access to such miracles. >> two billion have access and the remaining five billion, how do they wash? they wash like this: by hand. it is a time consuming labor which they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine. they don't want to spend such a large part of their life doing this hard work wit so relatively low productivity. but when i electric truer to environmentally concerned students they say everyone in the can world cannot ha
on theyu would put you to sleep but he has caught the roads attention because he gave a talk to technology entertainment decide more than 100,000 times here is part of it. >> when i saw my mother and though the washing machine for the first time in her life. >> even grandma was invited to see the machine. she had hand washed laundry for seven children and she sat down in front of the ch she watched the entire program and was mesmerized to my grandmother>> b the washing machine was a are >> there 7 billion people and most have no access to the miracle. hav >> 2 billion have access but the remainnng 5 billion how do they wash? like this. by hand. it is a hard time consuming labor that they have to do for hours every week. they want the washing machine that what the large part of their life doing this hard part with low productivity. but environmentally concerned students say that everybody can have them. how to retell this woman she cannot? >> students don't want them to? >> they are concerned aboutngou how many of you had to wash your genes? no one. s one time there was one boy. but there w
, united states is pushing forward with technology and the market economy and they ve a lot of good public health things beg done and the rest of the world that is dominateing, india and china, but in the 60's they ssed the market economies are good and they grow their economies and they are catching up. todaen we land, 2010, tse are the countries that borro money theichest when they have their problems. >> in my mind this raises two questions, or two amazing results from this. there have been thousands of years of human history and everyone was stuck on the lower left for thousands of years, it has been 200 years that you have all of this activity and how comeome countries are still stuck? >> it is easy to understand. the best message today is that most of thefrican countries are now in fast economic growth. they have correctedthe wrong market ideas they had 20 years ago, and they have a much better education than, -- and tanzania is similar to thailand in 1972 and soon we will see african countries doing good. >> this is wonderful. our problems are solved w know wh works and we will be
the container royalty fund. it was established in the 1960s to help dockworkers displaced by technology, the port alliance says these days those royalties serve as a bonus to workers, not a safety net. but the union disagrees saying the payments still help compensate workers for lost job opportunities. florida is home to almost a third of the ports that would be affected by the potential strike, governor rick scott says he's still thinks a deal will be reached, but if it doesn't he's counting on washington to step in. allison worrell, "n.b.r.," fort lauderdale, florida. >> susie: volatility was the word of the day here on wall street. investors were fixated on the war of words in washington over the fiscal cliff, and shrugged off some encouraging news today about jobs. fewer americans filed for jobless benefits last week: new claims fell 12,000 to 350,000. but the labor department says the christmas holiday may have distorted the numbers, as some state offices were closed monday and tuesday and could not provide data. in the markets, the volatility index, or what's often called the "fea
brennan and jon lapook. mark strassman on a new technology that could stop deadly drunk driving accidents. >> the optical signature registers above .08, then the vehicle will prevent you from moving. >> and with elephants under siege by poachers, m. sanjay meets a woman who has become a foster mother raising baby elephants until they can care for themselves. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> good evening. scott is off. i'm rebecca jarvis. in a few hours, the u.s. will go over the fiscal cliff which could trigger across-the-board tax increases and billions in spending cuts. however, there is hope for a soft landing. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell and president obama said today a deal was close. but late in the day house leaders announced they will not vote on a deal tonight. they're waiting for the senate. so what happens now? we have two reports beginning with nancy cordes on capitol hill. nancy, good evening. >> good evening to you, rebecca. it looks like the deadline pressure finally prompted a meeting of the minds today. negotiat
year. the japan electronics and information technology industries association said that worldwide production of mobile phones will rise 12% next year to $245 billion. that's as an increasing number of people switch to smartphones from regular mobile phones. but production by japanese makers, that will grow only by 1% to $17 billion. their share in the global market is expected to decline to 7% from the current 8%. japanese makers have been struggling to make inroads to the global market where apple and south korea's samsung remains strong. >>> the japanese are making use of the digital technologies to tap into the skin care market. fuji 2 uses a smartphone to analyze the condition of a person's skin. users place a sheet called a color reference chart alongside their face and take photos with smartphones that have special software inside. it compares the skin with their chart. it rates the user's skin condition. they say the data are uploaded and stored to help users and cosmetics companies to choose suitable skin care products and treatments. meanwhile, sony has utilized its digit
for the suggestion. we have about 25 minutes left. we'll come back and talk with jason pontin of the "mit technology review." the subject is about solving big problems in america. we'll take your calls in a moment. [video clip] >> the british admirals and generals were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and it's clear the colonists were pulling together the ammunition and cannons. the king basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the collins found out about the order in new hampshire and rhode island, they took the ammunition so everybody knew it was coming in the winter of 77 for-1775 -- in the winter of 1774-1775. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are focusing on the "mit technology review." we are talking about big problems in the world. we will get to this coverage in just a second. this is ja
are in companies investing in. >> when i was a corporate analyst in india tracking markets, technology was considered the engine of growth for the country and one of the bright spots for the market. is technology still one of the areas you are tell clients to invest in in india, or what are the sectors you're looking at? >> i think there's two sectors whether you look at india, china, or asia. there's two sectors we like. it's technology, as you said. i think that's one that -- it's a bright gem. you know, it went from, in india, from a bpo outsourcing business and has grown to an innovation business where brands are being developed and real technological gains are being had. the other sector we like is health care. the demand for health care in these markets is just continuing to grow steadily. obviously people are having longer lives, having more disposable income for health care and treatment. and so those are two sectors we really like. >> okay. and curious, as an emerging market investor, how closely are you watching the fiscal cliff negotiations here in the u.s., the debt crisis
that galvanized indians. >> our kids were going to be whoever they were going to be. >> but technology can help couples pick the sex of their child. the consequences and the concerns even here in the bay area. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, southern california: a womad a girl died after a car plowed into a bus benchn riverside. thi >>> developing introduce out of southern california. a woman and a girl died after a car plowed into a bus bench in riverside. this afternoon's crash also injured two others. it's unclear what caused the car to mount the sidewalk. >>> highway 1 near big sur is back open tonight. caltrans closed that road sunday after a rockslide. this week an emergency contractor cleared it and fixed the road and stabilized the hillside. the highway reopened to two-way traffic about an hour ago. >>> you don't have to pay to ride on muni tonight. the transit agency is offering free rides to celebrate its 100th birthday. buses, the underground, cable cars are all free. you can still hop on no charge until 5:00 tomorrow morning. >>> big fans. '60s. '70s and '80s the dmv has something new for you. cbs
this was not impersonal market forces, this was not technology, this was not globalization. what was happening was american politics and american economics were working against the middle class. people did this. we decided this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wo
into the early 21st century, the confidence has given way to doubt. technologically newer forms of travel especially airplanes and rocket-propelled capsules provide the sense of extreme danger that had faded during the relatively safer nineteentnineteent h century. equally, it's now clear that imperialism had smoothed the way from early circumnavigate is under political and social conditions that would be unwise and unjust to perpetuate let alone re-create. above all there is a growing sense of the planet as beginning to fight back or shrug us off. that that was environment the cost of planetary dominatiodominatio n that had begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel, every emerging fear that the planet could simply shrugged this off, continuing confidence if we might be able to generate technology and political alliances to dominate the planet but doubt that it is always wise to dominate it in that way. is especially apparent that the characteristic confidence of the long 19th century was the shortest of planetary experiences. yet it has been the most d
. that was because western societies degenerate technology and political networks that seem to have conquered the glow. at this point is not only possible to go around the world but it has become a popular pastime. representations of doing a circumnavigation became playful, enticing, even joyous. there were costs, not all of them hidden but they seem to be outweighed by the glories of making an easy swing of around the planet. over the 20th century and out into the early 21st century, the confidencconfidenc e has given way to doubt. technological new forms of travel, special airplanes and rocket propelled space capsules, extreme danger that faded during the relatively safe 19th century equal, it's now clear that imperialism has smooth the way for most further circumnavigators under political and social conditions that would be unwise and unjust to perpetuate let alone read create. above all there's a growing sense the planet is again beginning to fight back or shrug us off. now off. now that environment across of planetary domination has begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of a
effective mechanisms? >> technologically, for -- well, the biggest -- the quickest thing -- our energy efficiency in the u.s. isn't -- is not very good. and we've run economic models which suggest that if we put a $10 a ton tax on carbon, increasing $10 a ton per year, so that after 10 years, it's equivalent to a dollar a gallon on gasoline. that that would reduce carbon emissions in the us by 30%. which is about 11 times -- that 30% reduction is 11 times greater than the amount of carbon carried by this keystone xl pipeline. so it just shows how foolish that pipeline is, compared to the kind of steps that we should really be taking to ensure our energy independence. but the -- there are multiple ways that price would affect -- would reduce emissions. but, yeah, i -- and i don't really know that i should or could actually specify what -- which technology is gonna do. as i say, the marketplace is going to make those decisions. but there's a lot of potential already, well california is twice as efficient as the rest of the nation. it's about equivalent to europe, which is also twice as e
with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth. something unpleasant but -- and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. b
that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to tradition and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i've always considered to have the most deeply denzel identifiable culture shock is remaining. you know, nobody can admit there's a specific romanian culture that's been formed by the consul let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so german
win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. >> kelly: a quick check of the headlines. four people have been killed in a plane crash in russia. investigators say the airline careened off the runway and caught fire. no word yet on what caused the crash. >>> the windy city reaches a tragic milestone. chicago police say the city has logged its 500th homicide of the year. the latest victim was shot in the head outside a convenience store. >>> former president george h.w. bush's condition continues to improve. a family spokesperson says he has been moved out of intensive care unit, but remains hospitalized for a bronchitis-related issue. >> heather: as lawmakers try to hammer out a budget deal, president obama is also pushing for another more scaled down proposal. in the meantime just in case that doesn't happen. one, that according to many critics would only deal with half the problem. so is this really the best course of action? first, listen to what the pr
cutting edge technologies. >> reporter: the machine's developers have big dreams. they want to be provide handmade products to consumers around the world. >>> for the people who run japan's amusement arcade life is fast from fun and games. some operators are adapting by targeting the older player. >> more than half the people who visit this arcade on weekdays are age 60 or over. this couple is in their 70s. >> it's no fun staying alone at home. that's why i come here. >> translator: i haven't joined any senior citizen groups. it's more comfortable and less stressful here. >> reporter: we're in a shopping mall in a suburb of inazawa city. there is not a lot to do here as far as shops and entertainment goes. the mall is about the only game in town. the number of elderly customers is up by one-fifth from 14 years ago when the mall opened. so as the young and family clientele shrunk, the owner shifted his target to the elderly. he makes an effort to help the customers stay fit so they'll enjoy the games more. a daily exercise routine started this summer. it eases stiff joints and backs. the c
. >> the iranians are being continuing to amass technologies, learning how to enrich uranium, stockpiling low enriched uranium and it's getting to a level in which particularly one of iran's major rivals in the region, israel, is sounding the alarm bells and saying that the iranians are getting too close. >> graeme lawson, a great historian of the cuban missile crisis said that the iran nuclear issue is the cuban missile crisis in slow motion. (instrumental music) >> and north korea continues to make itself heard, regularly testing nuclear missiles despite international condemnation. >> it's estimated that the next time north korea tests a nuclear weapon it could be by highly enriched uranium, whereas the last two were believed to be through the plutonium route. so this is very problematic, not just because north korea having lots of fissile material is a bad thing, but north korea has a tradition of selling off anything that can garner hard currency on the open market. >> and though the soviet empire is a thing of the past, china is echoing the aspirations of its predecessor. >> there's no q
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opp
know the surveillance capabilities of the technology that we use. so in pennsylvania, a high school gave free laptops to all their students and until the students or their parents that they could turn on the camera from the school. they were only supposed to turn on if a laptop was going to take a picture of the feet. they took 50,000 photos of these high school students. and where do you have your laptop? you have it while you're sleeping, we go into the shower and so forth. it came to light when a principal slapped on a picture and said we see are using drugs, and he was shot. it was mike and ike candies. all this information can be used in ways that can benefit us in some ways, but also, whether you get a job, or based on your credit and insurance, it could be a digital doppelgÄnger. when you do traveling across the web. -- insurers are being told, don't bother with those expensive urine and blood tests if someone qualifies for life insurance. just look at their social network page. these are things that could get you in trouble. if you commute to work, you eat fast food. you ha
, then distribution, then production. in conjunction with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth, and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary for it to work. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is a
as long as they use technology that is fully voice-operated. supporters say it's better than having drivers type. but opponents say the hands free texting still draws attention away from the road. >>> other laws, carbon monoxide detectors must be installed in condominiums and apartments. two laws ban businesses and schools from demanding that employees or students share their information. breast feeding will be added to conditions that prevent discrimination in employment or housing. testing of self-driving cars will be allowed on california roads. >>> our recent winter storms have washed away many of our memories of last winter's very dry rainy season. but carter evans shows us, for those keeping track, the storms have eased concerns we could be headed for another drought. >> reporter: snow fell again today in california's mountains. the latest in a string of storms. if this trend continue, we'll be looking at express water rather than a shortage. he says the mounting snow pack is 146% higher than normal. it means the state's reservoirs will be in good supply. >> it's almost like p
as a country, it is a valuable technology. >> while the swedes are doing everything they can to minimize everything they can to minimize the waist, the paradox
graphics, icons, a mouse, and the point-and-click technology that is still standard. it was innovative and influential, but sales were disappointing, and jobs' confrontational management style became even more brittle. he would try and rationalize it in this taped interview with isaacson. >> i feel totally comfortable going in front of everybody else, you know, "god, we really [bleep] up the engineering on this, didn't we?" that's the ante for being in the room. so we're brutally honest with each other, and all of them can tell me they think i'm full of [bleep], and i can tell anyone i think they're full of [bleep], and we've had some rip-roaring arguments where we're yelling at each other. >> jobs loved the arguments but not everybody else did, and isaacson writes that some of his top people began defecting. >> he was not the world's greatest manager. in fact, he could have been one of the world's worst managers. you know, he was always, you know, upending things and, you know, and throwing things into turmoil. this made great products, but it didn't make for a great management style.
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as long as they use technology that is fully voice-operated and hands- free. the supporters say the new law is better than having drivers type while they're driving but opponents say hands-free texting still draws attention away from the road. >>> among other laws that will go into effect on new year's day, carbon monoxide detectors must be installed in condominiums and apartments along with smoke detectors. two laws ban businesses and schools from demanding that employees or students share their social media information. breast-feeding will be added to protected conditions that prevent discrimination in employment or housing. school officials and coaches must report suspected child sexual abuse. and testing of self-driving cars will be allowed on california roads. >>> here in the bay area, another county is jumping on the plastic bag ban on new year's day. alameda county joins san francisco, san mateo county, san jose and 49 other california cities and counties that don't provide free single use plastic bags at grocery stores. all stores selling packaged food must also charge at least
smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. yeah we both relieve coughs, sneezing, aches, fevers. and i relieve nasal congestion. overachiever. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. >> finally tonight, it began as a lesson in holiday humility, that it is better to give than to receive. two years later, it's now a major effort to help those that need it most. one burrito at a time. ben tracey has the story. >> reporter: it began with a lengthy christmas wish list. >> i asked for an iphone, mac book air and ipad, and an ipod. >> reporter: and a very frustrated dad. >> i went, this is too much and i didn't want to raise a spoiled child. >> reporter: michael johnson
with natural gas. and now we have the technology to get it out. but critics argue that it's energy with a very steep price. >> i don't believe that fracking will ever be safe. >> reporter: later on sunday morning, the promise and the perils of fracking. >> osgood: jamie foxx has to be one of the most talented people in american show business. you name it. he does it. byron pitts will get him to show you. >> jamie foxx has made it all the way from the little town of texas to the pinnacle of hollywood. ♪ she knows how to... >> my book will be called "i still pinch myself." >> reporter: he's funny. he can sing. he's an oscar winner. you'll see him later. ♪ ahead on sunday morning >> osgood: as the year 2012 comes to a close this morning, we continue our holiday tradition here at sunday morning. we take time out to remember some of the remarkable people who have left us in the year just pending. >> 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,. ♪ take a load off... >> osgood: they made our hearts sing. they made our spirits soar. >> that's one small step for man. >> osgood: some saved lives, some gave their
year with entertainment, politics and technology, including a new website from the creators of twitter. that's a big deal. >> first, we want to say hello to carson daly, hosting new year's festivities tonight. >> hi, mom. >> number nine for you. >> oh, my gosh, yeah. mtv years added in, it's like number 15 i've-in times square. it's a tradition i've grown to love. i heard al say it's almost -- '09 was record cold. and we're going to reach that. >> bundle up tonight. >> you still have to get excited when you're standing there with a million people below you. >> it's fun. it's one of those things like halfway through the show, am i going to do this next year? and then when the ball drops you're like, i'm so lucky to have the greatest seat in the house. we try to bring all the excitement and the danger and the fun that is times square. >> you'll be adding a level of fun this year. >> from "the office," rather than just talking to people, we're asking people on twitter to write us and give us from dares for angela to do. that should make for some -- and in trouble for that reason. >> along
the local funding is and also i wanted to know if you could comment on if there are any new technologies or alternative protective measures that would be very useful in terms of how we protect diplomats and to what extent if we had any new technologies that you say would be useful, would have would have made a difference in benghazi? >> let me just say, someone who is relatively new to this department but has traveled to almost every hotspot in the world, the men and women who have protected security is beyond heroic. i wish we could be here and say that with 100% certainty nothing happens but as you know it's not a proposition. i'm every day amazed and remember we have over 275 consulates, many of them in very dangerous areas where diplomatic security are not only protecting our bass at her and at usaid and like-minded folks all over the world. your point is taken, which is we are having to deal with budgetary constraints but it no time do any of us believe the quality of those men and women protecting us and anyways in anyways diminished. >> you know i mean, we do have the opportunity
candidate taken down by technology. >> yeah. >> hidden camera video captures him saying he does not care about the half of the country and it's not his job to be concern concerned about them, he was on unconcerned that he did not care that there were part of the 47% in the room. >> honey boo and jersey shore were at the top of the lift. >> jersey shore had to be cancelled by mtv because actual stories in politics were far sexier. cia, sex scandal, secret service, prostitutes in columbia, they hung it up with the jersey shore. and. >> snooki is a mom, when the show first started that is a thing that you never thought would happen. >> no, i'm not a mother, i don't know why i said a mother, i'm not a father either. i'm a responsible adult, snooki was getting wild drunk a month before getting pregnant. >> the end of the world didn't happen. >> no, i was disappointed. i called last week on earth and i was gambling that the world would end. it's a weird thing when people were hoping that the world was going to end. they were like do you want to go to the end of the world party and i was like n
to use ever, right, lauri? >> yes. this is very technological. imagine if you could completely replace your phone with your glove. it sounds crazy but there's a company that's created these bluetooth gloves that are just awesome. so instead of exactly telling you about it, let me show it to you. i demoed the gloves with a rep and take a look at how they work in action. >> in the thumb you've got a speaker and in the pinkie you have a microphone. so you can make the you can make the classical me gesture and talk on the phone that way. >> i hear your voice coming from my thumb right now. crazy stuff, don. very interesting. i could hear his voice in my thumb. it was inspector gadgeting. they don't look cool but you will get a lot of looks on the street like this. >> for us children of the '80s, i'm really a child of the '70s. we are bringing the arcade to your pocket. what's this one? >> i'm a baby of the '80s. think about going to the arcade and playing games. there is something called icade. you can put your iphone in adevice and use the joy stick to play the games. they have it for the
as long as they use voice operated hands free technology. safety experts disapprove of the new law. each year some 5500 people are killed in crashes that involve distracted drivers there. are several driving laws taking effect on january 1st. currently drivers suspected of driving under the influence have the option of taking a breath, blood or urine test. that test is being eliminated. also new standards for red light cameras as well as an amber alert for seniors. the silver alert system is for missing people older than 65. >> law enforcement will be out in full force to make sure new year's partyers don't start to early and get out of hand. several cities will all hold dui checkpoints tonight. police say research shows crashes involving alcohol, dropped by an average of 20% when well known checkpoints are conducted. >>> drivers busted or dui say a new proposal won't work. jerry hill wants drivers convicted of a second dui to install locking devices in their cars. >> we have tried increasing fines. we have tried to revoke licenses to deter those offenders but we need to do more to sav
generation that's using a new tool in the environment, technology. during egypt's uprising, for instance, i was getting tweets and twist at which timers and facebook posts and i can imagine you, don, trying to get to the american media to spread the word. so i think that the path we're on now, while it's still bloody and tragic, maybe a better path towards eventual peace in the u.s. i'm not predicting it for 2013. the last is the gay marriage story. you can't legislate love, but you can support love when it's there. and i think people are growing and progressing and i think ultimately that's a big story for this year, as far as evolution is concerned. >> you know, it's interesting. as you were reeling off those stories and those are just a few of them, having to cover these stories, you wonder why we aren't -- the news people aren't the most depressed people in the world. but then the viewer is also taking it in at home, and it has to be affecting them as well. >> of course. it absolutely does. i mean, i know that you just got back from connecticut and you and i had an e-mail exchange earli
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing d
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